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I was wondering what your recommendations would be on using either a rod system (Lansky, etc.) or a clamp on knife guide. I don't have the steadiest hands, and I have a problem maintaining a consistent angle when using a regular stone. I have seen your posts on what type of stone to use, and am looking for ideas to make the time I have to sharpen my knives more efficient. Thank you.

Scott
 

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Sharpening each of my chefs knives takes no more than 5 minutes - using a stone. I suggest that you search further into the forum. Other members have posted valuable information pertaining to the "rod" and clamp style sharpening system of which I have no experience.
 

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Aaaaaggghhhhh - my husband put a chip/dent in my Henckles chef knife!!:cry: He said he cut something on a ceramic plate and it chipped. The knife was laying on the cutting board and I spotted it from across the kitchen. I've been using my rod to sharpen but how do I get rid of the dent? Please help!:(
 

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Dent,
Grab the knife in your right hand. Call your husband and chase him around swinging it and put a few matching dents in it. Then when all is clear go to the 5-10 store and buy him a plastic french knife and tell him this is yours.
I'm wondering if I'm different, but my knives are off limit to the world. Not my working knives but my personal home knives.
 

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Don't stress too much about the nick. The main thing is to align any bends in the steel of the edge at and around the nick. Your rod will do that fine. Over time, as you continue to sharpen the knife, you'll work your way in to the nicked area so it just becomes part of the main edge again.

If it's a monstrous nick, you could have it reforged. Isn't worth the price though for a Henckels...

Phil
 

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You could put a similiar dent in his head :) Sorry to hear about your Henckel. You can hammer it out carefully. I've had a similiar experience with a bent tip after having dropped it on the quarry tile.

Kuan
 

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:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Panini - I'm with you! My knives are sacred. Even more so because I made a special trip to Munich last year to buy them so I could say that I had authentic german knives.
Thank you for the tips, the dent hasn't affected my cutting so I'll just keep sharpening before each use and wait and wait and wait:rolleyes: :rolleyes: for it to slowly go away.
 

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I just checked it out very carefully and it's definately a dent. On one side of the blade there is a tiny dent and you can see it pushed out on the other side. I'm assuming a notch is similar to a chip where a piece is taken out and this isn't the case. Any other suggestions?
 

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Well, if you're going to pound the blade back into shape, then do it right. Use either a soft rubber mallet or one made of brass. A local well stocked hardware store or a gunsmith should have one. So should a machinist.
 
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