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I'm looking for the measuring cups for hard to work with semi liquids(like honey, sour cream, etc.). I've seen them used in cooking shows but not in the stores. They are like a "push pop". You set it to the required measurement fill it and then push it out and it levels off. I've checked Amazon.com and Willy sonoma and have done a search on the boards here. Any help would be great. :)

[ July 26, 2001: Message edited by: Svadhisthana ]
 

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I love mine, found them at varying times at local cooking stores. You know, one of the things they are most useful for is measuring shortening or other fats. You can push all the fat out and not spend a lot of time trying to get all the shortening out of you measuring cups.
 

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I got mine too from the Rob McIntosh (or MacIntosh) store in Lancaster, Ontario. It was worth the trip.

Ever tried it for peanut butter, Nancya?

:p

[ July 23, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
 

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How much does a cup of peanut butter weigh?

:eek:
 

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BritCook:

Most recipes here in America are listed in terms of volume instead of weight - most recipes except for bread in which both volume and weight are specified.

Now that I've been breadmaking for at least 7 months, I see the usefullness of scales when it comes to baker's percentages to increase the total output. I am now considering getting a baker's scale.
 

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I know what you mean regarding the measurement 12 ozs of flour. For dry goods, one needs to be consistent when using measuring cups.
 

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A cup of carefully sifted all-purpose flour weighs 4 ounces, but if you pack unsifted flour firmly into that cup, it will hold 6 ounces, 50 percent more! With that margin of error, it's no wonder ten people following the same recipe can't make the same cookies for instance.

So 12 ounces of flour will yield approximately 3 cups, again, depending on your method for measuring. Unless specified, the flour is sifted after measuring.

American cookbooks and magazines provide the method they used for testing recipes. It could be either of these methods:
  • Fluff your flour gently, then spoon it into your dry measuring cup, without packing it down until it overflows slightly from the top. Scrape the excess with a pastry scraper, a chopstick or anything with a straight edge; or
  • the scoop and scrape method.
No contest, the scale is a far better measuring tool.

[Edited text shown in italics]

[ July 27, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
 

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Svad,

Did you order it yet, from Mezzaluna's source?

I promise, mine is very similar and works beautifully!

:)
 
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