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You subtract it from 100 to get the percentage of the total cost of the selling price.

In your example, since you want the profit to be 15%, the total cost would have to be 85% of the selling price.

Likewise, if you want the profit to be 50%, the total cost before would have to be 100-50 = 50(%)
 

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You don't have a light bill, garbage bill, waste oil bill, impact fees, health department fees, state taxes & fees, a gas bill, water bill, rents, advertisements, general upkeep, or employees?

If you charge 15% on top of total food cost, then your profit will be 0%...or $0.00...whichever is easier to understand.

Maybe I'm not understanding the logic in the OP...
Total cost means food cost plus every other costs you mentioned.
 

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I will respectfully disagree on your term definition. Food Cost should be its own separate thing. Overhead expenses tend to be more stable. Labor and Food Cost fluctuate depending on your managing. If a 15 % profit is a general target, that is fine, but your High profit/ High demand items would be discounted to your detriment by your calculations.
You totally lost me there. Did you read the OP's original question? He's asking about a math question he's studying at school...
 
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