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My first thought is the following:

If this is your client, and you are charging for advice, what is my cut?

My second thought is that oils do indeed go rancid, but not moldy.  Here's a thought for you:

Water is life.

Mold is a form of life.

Countless nations and peoples have been using this fact for countless centuries.

Water can take on many forms.  Condensation is one form.

I guess I'm speaking in riddles, but again, it ain't my client, and I ain't getting paid.....
 

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Oh, I forgot'

You can beat sugar as long and as fine as you want, it won't dissolve in oil. Neither will salt for that matter. Which is why both are known as "water soluable".    I was taught this in grade 9 chemistry. 

Do I win a prize?
 

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Say what?

I'm not promoting "my business" here, you get the commission, you work for it.

Yes, sugar dissolves in butter when you cream it. But butter isn't 100% fat, is it? You got 18-20% water to account for. Do I win a prize for knowing the fat content of table butter? Do you?

Look, your client has mold issues, and yet you are talking about fats going rancid. Rancidity and mold are two very separate, distinct issues.

Here's another riddle, and one that deals directly with your problem.

From ship's biscuits to pemmican, from raisins to pasta, all of these foods have incredible shelf life, and have been used for centuries, from farmers to explorers, armies and navies.
What is their common link? Why do they keep so long?

Earn your commission!
 

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I have no idea what ship's biscuits or pemmican are. Perhaps it is a cultural reference??? I am from the Untied States.
Ummm... Pemmican IS N. American, about as american as you can get....

The point I'm making with all of the foods I mentioned is that they all have incredible shelf life, years actually. No refrigeration or fancy packaging.needed And yet all of these foods will never develop mold if stored in proper conditions

C'mon now, think! What does mold need in order to survive?

Remove that, and you have no mold issues. This is what countless cultures figured out literally thousands of years ago. Yours is not a unique problem, other bakers have dealt with it succesfully many, many years ago when ALL foods and ingredients were organic, and transportation took nine months.
 

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Moisture causes mold.
Yup. And like I said, butter has around 20% water, eggs have water content too. Hard to say where the moisture problem is withot looking at the formula, but it may not even be with the formulation,

What you need to do is follow your haccp procedure from mixing to packaging to transport to the store shelf, and look for potential moisture issues. Condensation is always one of the "usual suspects", but it could be many other things.

Of course, you do have a haccp procedure, right? You are supplying multiple retail outlets with a product that has a 9 mnth shelf life, most chains want a minimm of an iso 9002 rating for baked goods, you wouldn't need it if you went raw/frozen.
 
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