Chef Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,873 Posts
Oh for goodness sakes!!!!!! You don't use serrated knives on wood, period! You might as well be using a saw.

Cheap hard poly board, that is all. The black ones with the pebble surface will likely show up the inevitable scratched less.

If you want a wood-ish look, bamboo might be hard enough, if you don't saw excessively hard. It's not that bamboo collects dirt, but that it is full of silica and much glue which is also abrasive because of the filler used in the glue.

You really don't need to give a serrated knife all that much protection, a granite counter actually won't do all that much harm to it, if you have the pointy-tooth type of scallop as opposed to the smooth-wave kind. Here I don't have any idea what you mean by the "ultra-sharp" kind.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,873 Posts
Ahaha, it's not you, that's just the kind of thing inexperienced people do. Heck, there was a time I would cut on a ceramic plate with a straight-edged knife. I didn't sharpen the knives, or even think about that, that was the knife sharpeners job (my father), and amazingly he never complained about it. I was just surprised no one had yet nixed the wood and serrated knife combo.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,873 Posts
Yeah when I read "the ultra sharp serrated kind" I think of the old Ginsu infomercials with the knives that could "cut through a nail, a tin can, and a radiator hose, and still cut a tomato paper thin!"

If that's what we're talking about here, sawing through stuff with those is going to mark up whatever you use. Might as well try the suggested bamboo if you want a wood board.
Yeh, I did actually think that would be the best guess, pointy tooth, cause only a serious knife type would spend the dough on the wavy edge kind.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top