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Hi everyone,

Hoping someone could help me with a problem!

When we're serving a Sunday roast I want to make my own gravy using the meat juices but they don't seem to be able to stretch the whole service, I always run out!

I've added dry granules and some water to stretch it but the taste isn't meaty enough.

What do you add make your gravy go further? I've heard about a Knorr product (Gravy Paste) but I haven't tried it, wondered if anyone else had tried the product and their thoughts?

I work in a pub so serving a good Sunday roast is very important to customers.

Look forward to responses /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
 

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Exactly how much gray do you need to produce?

couple of suggestions.

add a good layer of mirepoix under the roast and if you can get it an extra layer of beef fat. Remove the roast and deglaze the veggies and pan.

Make demiglaze before you make your roast..... and that should do the trick nicely.
 

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Hi everyone,

Hoping someone could help me with a problem!

When we're serving a Sunday roast I want to make my own gravy using the meat juices but they don't seem to be able to stretch the whole service, I always run out!

I've added dry granules and some water to stretch it but the taste isn't meaty enough.

What do you add make your gravy go further? I've heard about a Knorr product (Gravy Paste) but I haven't tried it, wondered if anyone else had tried the product and their thoughts?

I work in a pub so serving a good Sunday roast is very important to customers.

Look forward to responses /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
The easiest way to stretch a batch without diluting the meat flavor would be with a prepared demi-glace. Good quality ones can come frozen for a reasonable price. Just make your gravy the way you're currently doing it and add more thickener and liquid to account for the added demi-glace to make everything (flavor, thickness, salt) balance out.

For what it's worth could you please tell us exactly how you're making your gravy? The classic procedure basically goes:

Remove roast from pan, set aside to rest. Add mirepoix to pan, cook, add flour to make roux with rendered fat (suet,schmaltz, from whatever you cooked) from the roast. Add stock/water (boquet, sachet or other aromatics optional) and cook. Add juices from rested meat as well. Any trim or bones (gizzards, necks, beef chains etc.) also belong in a gravy.
 

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Hey sorry for reviving this post from 4 years ago.

I am running into a similar issue at home where my porterhouse roast doesn't seem to produce any more than two tiddly spots of dripping, and I absolutely love my gravy even when it may not be the healthiest thing by a long stretch.

Anyway, at the peril of asking something totally stupid, has anyone tried just adding a bunch of soup bones along side with the roast? I'd be very interested to know if this would do the trick and give me more of that precious dripping to make the real deal.

Cheers for any insight!
-- rookie
 

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We cook short ribs and use the jus for many things... Recently we kept running low and had to wing it with beef stock and a corn starch slurry... So I just started adding more mire poix, wine, herb, roasted beef stock base and tomato paste to the shorties when I cooked them.. def yielded a lot more jus
 
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