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Questions concerning pasta dough

5078 Views 31 Replies 8 Participants Last post by  kokopuffs
This weekend I'll be using my Marcato Atlas pasta machine for the first time.  On hand are semolina flour from Bob's Red Mill and some real Italian Caputo 00 flour.  The final flour mixture will be a 50-50 blend of both flours along with some salt.  For the dough I plan to use one of two recipies: Ruhlman's where the eggs are weighed and multiplied by 1.5 to give the weight of the flour; or, use one egg for every 100g of flour.  Any helpful comments are welcome.

The pasta noodles will be made at my house and will then be transported to a friend's house a couple of minutes away where they'll be cooked.  Again, I need some info concerning a slight delay in cooking them.  Should the noodles be floured and covered with plastic wrap (also during transport) or what?

Once made, the noodles will be hung on a pasta rack but for how long before transport?????
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I use the 1 egg/100g flour. It's foolproof. Never tried Ruhlman's because the other is foolproof.

Not sure about mixing low gluten Caputo with high gluten semolina, though. Typically I use AP and egg for fresh pasta, and semolina and water for extruded. If I thought Caputo would make a significant diference I'd totally sub that for the AP. I have never heard of anyone doing it the hybrid way you mention... but that may just be something I just never heard..........................
Caputo 00 is a soft wheat as are most European flours, to my knowledge. The blend of flours, Caputo + semolina, is something I got off of the Internet.

FWIW I substituted White Lily AP (soft southern wheat) for KA AP in my last bread dough and the resulting texture was much much softer.

500g KA Bread Flour (hard wheat)

300g White Lily AP (soft wheat)

100g whole wheat or rye flours (any combination thereof)

590 - 610g water

18g salt

3 TBS olive oil or lard
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................Semolina and all purpose flour with egg yolks, olive oil, pinch of salt, and a splash of vinegar.

Kneading and resting the dough are important.

IMHO you can throw out pasta recipes, cause when you get into making the dough, it's the consistency issue that makes or breaks the pasta.

Recipes are merely guidelines.

The amount of flour you must keep adding to make the dough less sticky while rolling, causes you to utilize more flour then the recipe calls for

in the first place.
What purpose does the vinegar serve???
.............................
Not sure about mixing low gluten Caputo with high gluten semolina, though. Typically I use AP and egg for fresh pasta, and semolina and water for extruded. If I thought Caputo would make a significant diference I'd totally sub that for the AP. I have never heard of anyone doing it the hybrid way you mention... but that may just be something I just never heard......................
The 50-50 mixture of soft wheat flour and semolina was printed in the instruction manual accompanying my pasta machine.
Vitamin C used in bread baking, it's an acid:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/7416/ascorbic-acid
I make pasta at work weekly kokopuffs.

I use The French Laundry recipe doctored.

Semolina and all purpose flour with egg yolks, olive oil, pinch of salt, and a splash of vinegar.

Kneading and resting the dough are important.......................
My shoulder aches after all of this kneading! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif Next time a splash of vinegar will be used for relaxing the gluten!!!!!
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3
@panini: once the dough was made I reviewed many recipes for pasta dough. Water + eggs (at least more per 100g of flour than 1 egg per 100g). Hmmm, my dough clocked in at 250g semolina flour mixed with durham wheat (from Bob's Red Mill) and 250g Caputo 00 flour plus 6 eggs and perhaps around 10ml of water. Methinks more water could have been added to the dough to loosen it a bit. Just like bread making, pasta dough is a learning curve, especially from someone who's name ends in a vowel!!!!!!!!!!!!!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smiles.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rollsmile.gif/img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif

Best,

Terry Kokosenski
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More flour. Flour is your friend. After rolling the pasta, lay it out on the counter with ample flour on both sides. Let the dough rest and dry some before passing it through the linguine die.
Could it be that his sheet of pasted needed another pass thru the flat rollers which maybe should be adjusted closer together to achieve a thinner sheet of pasta??????
OOPS!

I meant to say an overage of moisture problem....

My bad.

mimi
8)

Please re-edit your original post to read:

The noodles are described as difficult to separate which would be (EDIT) an overage of moisture problem......

8)
Koko....I don't believe that would make any difference because the dough is too moist and the cutters, no matter what setting, will only cut through so far leaving with you the problem of having to separate them by hand.
THAT statement explains it better, the inability to cut all the way thru due to moistness. Dryness on the other hand allows for separation.
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