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Recently, I've been doing a lot of home projects with unfermented doughs; namely, I make a lot of Biang Biang Mien (hand stretched and ripped noodles) and dumplings. In both cases, I use what referred to here in Germany as Type 550 flour (bread flour with a slightly higher gluten content than AP flour). Something I noticed when I made Biang Biang Mien today was that the dough was harder to roll out than normal, did not stretch out as much as usual, and tended to spring back after being rolled. Is there any rule of thumb for the effect that salt amounts have on the dough's behavior? Neither of these doughs use any yeast, sugar, or natural fermentation.
 

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Salt isn't as much of a determining factor as much as the QUALITY of gluten in the flour you are using.

Gluten is formed by gliaden and glutenin coming together with moisture and agitation to form gluten. Usually taking 24 hours to fully form.

Bread flour only has slightly more protein in it than AP flour but the quality of gluten formed in winter wheat is much higher. Semolina flour has the same amount of protein as AP flour but has a much much higher quality of protein in it than AP flour....of course rolling out Semolina noodles by hand is very hard unless you increase the hydration of the noodle dough....but this is usually counterproductive to what you want.


Salt does bind up some water and is good for flavor....but the amounts needed to have a shortening effect are so high that the noodles will be inedible.
It's easier to get too much sugar than it is salt.
 

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Recently, I've been doing a lot of home projects with unfermented doughs; namely, I make a lot of Biang Biang Mien (hand stretched and ripped noodles) and dumplings. In both cases, I use what referred to here in Germany as Type 550 flour (bread flour with a slightly higher gluten content than AP flour). Something I noticed when I made Biang Biang Mien today was that the dough was harder to roll out than normal, did not stretch out as much as usual, and tended to spring back after being rolled. Is there any rule of thumb for the effect that salt amounts have on the dough's behavior? Neither of these doughs use any yeast, sugar, or natural fermentation.
flour changes with the seasons, it can vary wildly no matter what the label states.
 
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