Chef Forum banner
1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The classic French mother, and daughter sauces can turn an ordinary meal into haute cusine. My challenge is to use these sauces to elevate your favorite roasts, poultry, seafood, or any of your favorite recipes. As always, picture are helpfull. Recipes need t be sbmitted up to September 30th, with descrptions of techniqus, and ingrediants. Any recipes other than your own creations must include the recipe scource, giving credit where credit is due. I'm really looking forward to seeing the entries. We hacesuch talented cooks here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,723 Posts
Eish man, I'm not a sauce person...
Gonna be tricky.
How about spoofs of the French sauces so they fit my SE Asian cooking style?
Besides that, I gotta go through my books to remember the lot of them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
I have an old Escoffier book with all the Mother sauces, but it's not really "sauce weather" here yet considering most of them are a roux base.
Interesting you should say 'sauce weather' because I was thinking the same. It's been so hot lately, and I'm just not feeling rich sauces right now, or the recipes that go along with them. When I think of sauce espagnole, or starting a demi glace, I think of colder weather. Even hollandaise or bernaise is too much for these hot days (yes, we've had a couple of 'heat domes' lately.). Beurre blanc is as much as I could manage, I think.
I guess seasons and the weather affect how we chose what we eat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
the problem is getting hold of veal bones, without that....I resort to mostly marchand de vin style.
I started in french kitchens 50 yrs ago and the stodgy floured sauces were already past, never saw one except in the white sauces such as bechamel types.

Restaurants know all the short cut tricks for complicated sauces, a perfectly decent perigourdine is made by mixing truffled foi gras with soft butter, add a spoonful to bordelaise in the saute pan.

Grand veneur, same approach with bordelaise but finish with red current jelly and a bit of cream, to do the " authentic" version is silly, you need hares blood , not gonna happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,605 Posts
Let me just note that the "official" mother sauces are:
  • bechamel
  • espagnole
  • tomate
  • velouté
  • mayonnaise
  • (arguably) Hollandaise / sabayon
Escoffier listed only the first four, but then later on noted that mayonnaise was "like" a mother for cold sauces, and by about 1912 or so the sabayon-based sauces had been sort of informally included in the list.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,605 Posts
Entry #1 for me: a pretty straightforward use of classic sauce béchamel, for a gratin of eggs and spinach.

Boil eggs 6 minutes, chill, shell, to make oeufs mollets.
Food Tableware Egg Ingredient Cuisine

Basic béchamel: 2 Tb each butter and flour, then 2 cups milk, a little salt and nutmeg.
Food Kitchen appliance Home appliance Kitchen utensil Recipe
Food Ingredient Cuisine Cookware and bakeware Frying pan

1 pound spinach cooked in a little butter with a hint of nutmeg.
Food Plant Ingredient Tableware Recipe

Spinach, then eggs, then Gruyère, then béchamel, then Parmesan.
Food Dishware Recipe Ingredient Tableware

Broil.
Food Dishware Tableware Ingredient Recipe

Eat with crusty bread.
Food Tableware Egg yolk Ingredient Recipe
Food Hot cross bun Ingredient Staple food Graham bread
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
....
How about spoofs of the French sauces so they fit my SE Asian cooking style?
the problem is getting hold of veal bones, without that....I resort to mostly marchand de vin style.
....Restaurants know all the short cut tricks for complicated sauces, a perfectly decent perigourdine is made by mixing truffled foi gras with soft butter, add a spoonful to bordelaise in the saute pan.

Grand veneur, same approach with bordelaise but finish with red current jelly and a bit of cream, to do the " authentic" version is silly, you need hares blood , not gonna happen.
I've been thinking about these comments. Do we need to do absolutely authentic French sauces, as they were made in Escoffier's kitchen? All of us here are perfectly capable of spending hours/days on glace de veau, but what about using 'glace de porc'? I use the same technique for tonkotsu, and pig neck & feet are much easier to find. Why not a sauce chausseur for pork? Make it Asian-style, with Shiaoxing?

Or instead of red wine, use the old time Quebec substitution of strong black tea instead, to mimic the tannins in red wine? Which is a new one to me, I found that in the google search below:
Inspired by @butzy, I googled https://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/how-to-fake-fdrench-sauces/

And, I make red currant jelly every year just to add to sauces, so I'm no stranger to over-complicating things!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've been thinking about these comments. Do we need to do absolutely authentic French sauces, as they were made in Escoffier's kitchen? All of us here are perfectly capable of spending hours/days on glace de veau, but what about using 'glace de porc'? I use the same technique for tonkotsu, and pig neck & feet are much easier to find. Why not a sauce chausseur for pork? Make it Asian-style, with Shiaoxing?

Or instead of red wine, use the old time Quebec substitution of strong black tea instead, to mimic the tannins in red wine? Which is a new one to me, I found that in the google search below:
Inspired by @butzy, I googled https://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/how-to-fake-fdrench-sauces/

And, I make red currant jelly every year just to add to sauces, so I'm no stranger to over-complicating things!
There is definitely room for your own take on the Escoffier recipes. Many of the ingredients are very hard to come by, while others are very expensive. I only ask that you try to maintain the theme of the original, and use it to elevate something. I would even go so far as to say that traditional Hispanic, African, Eastern Europe, an Asian sauces be utilized, again making them as traditional as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
I've been thinking about these comments. Do we need to do absolutely authentic French sauces, as they were made in Escoffier's kitchen? All of us here are perfectly capable of spending hours/days on glace de veau, but what about using 'glace de porc'? I use the same technique for tonkotsu, and pig neck & feet are much easier to find. Why not a sauce chausseur for pork? Make it Asian-style, with Shiaoxing?

Or instead of red wine, use the old time Quebec substitution of strong black tea instead, to mimic the tannins in red wine? Which is a new one to me, I found that in the google search below:
Inspired by @butzy, I googled https://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/how-to-fake-fdrench-sauces/

And, I make red currant jelly every year just to add to sauces, so I'm no stranger to over-complicating things!
30 years ago i was the pastry chef at the bay tower room in Boston, a guy was applying to be a cook, the chef failed him because he didn't know how espagnole is made by the book.
The kid said " no-one even makes those sauces any more"
In a sense he was right, someone is making them somewhere but they aren't drawing crowds.
its even more true today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
I've been thinking about these comments. Do we need to do absolutely authentic French sauces, as they were made in Escoffier's kitchen? All of us here are perfectly capable of spending hours/days on glace de veau, but what about using 'glace de porc'? I use the same technique for tonkotsu, and pig neck & feet are much easier to find. Why not a sauce chausseur for pork? Make it Asian-style, with Shiaoxing?

Or instead of red wine, use the old time Quebec substitution of strong black tea instead, to mimic the tannins in red wine? Which is a new one to me, I found that in the google search below:
Inspired by @butzy, I googled https://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/how-to-fake-fdrench-sauces/

And, I make red currant jelly every year just to add to sauces, so I'm no stranger to over-complicating things!
I made a passable stock using lamb bone, chicken bones, a beef bone, pigs trotter and the usual veg.
I live next to a farmer but he ships his cattle south to be butchered, next time I visit Boston the plan is to grab a case of veal bones at the meat mkt in southie.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top