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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought Pierre Herme's Dessert book. He prefers to use cake and pastry rings on sheet pans lined with parchment rather than cake pans and tart pans. With the rings, he uses sheet pans so he can just slide the finished product off rather than having to lift a delicate cake or tart.

I don't mind buying new rings because I'd like to try a more professional technique but can I just use an inverted jellyroll pan rather than having to buy new sheet pans as well. Is there any problem with warping of the pan as it heats and thus ruining the finished product?
 

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Excellent cookbook isn't it? A true master pastry chef.

Try the "Chocolate Temptation" Recipe page 225. The incorporation of the avacado is spectacular.

I don't think it will be a problem. If you look in the glossary on page 276, it appears the "sheet pan" and "jelly roll pan" are one in the same versus a "baking sheet".

There's only one way to find out for sure! Let us know how it goes.
 

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This brings up a question for me. There's a difference in the volume a sheet pan and baking sheet pan holds. Is there a place on the web that measures the capacity of the different pans? As it is, I wind up calling my son to do the mathematics for me as I can never remember the formulas.:eek:
 

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alexia,

Unless you're creating your own recipes, most should be written for specific sized pans. If you need to know the volume of a square or rectangle pan, measure and multiply length x width x height.

To calculate the volume of a circular pan (a cylindrical shape) go here.
 

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Thanks, that's a great help. I've bookmarked it.
 

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The only difference between the two pans is the weight/thickness of the aluminum. A jelly roll pan is usually a thinner item that home cooks use...where as a sheet pan is for heavy use in comercial kitchens (although their now marketing them to non-pro.s) and is thicker. Thickness of metal pans and pots do affect how quickly heat transfers and your temp. and times.....but to bake a cake it shouldn't have any horrible effects just it baking too quickly. You can use two stacked together jelly roll (2 will better equal 1 sheet pan) pans to difuse the heat an act like 1 sheet pan.

I have only had limited amounts of ring molds, everything can be baked or prepared in regular cake pans or springform pans. Place a piece of parchment under your items so they don't stick to the pans and that works fine.
 

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You got me curious about the pans now, here's a definition I found interesting:

Jelly-roll pan:
A rectangular baking pan that features a 1-inch edge and is usually 18 x 13 inches in size - commercially known as a "half-sheet pan." In home baking, sizes vary; a common size listed in recipes is 151Ú2 x 101Ú2 x 1 inch.

It is preferred for baking sheet cakes, sponge cakes, or bars. (It gets its name because the sponge cake for a jelly roll cake is baked in this pan.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cchiu...

You are a font of good information:) Thanks a lot.
BTW, Herme's book is wonderful. The recipes are accessible for the amateur such as myself and the pictures are gorgeous. I've only just tried a couple of the simpler recipes so far. I'm building up the courage to try some of the more elaborate ones.
 
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