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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm making sloppy joes tonight.  I admit to you here and now that I have not eaten a sloppy joe since grade school, about 25yrs ago.  I'm remembering a bright red messy sandwich, slightly sweet, slightly tangy.  If anyone has a good recipe please share, I want this to be good.

Also, what does one serve with a sloppy joe? Tater tots?
 

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my trick is to sub chopped bread and butter pickles instead of green pepper. I grind a 50/50 brisket sirloin mix. I also use BBQ sauce in addition to ketchup. I like it spicy too, so I lean heavy on hot sauce. Tots are popular side right now but I stick to fries or hand cut chips

2.5lb ground beef mix
1 large sweet onion
1/3 cup chopped bread and butter pickle
2 celery stalks fine chop
1 can diced tomato
12oz beer. (I use IPA)
1/4 cup ketchup
1 tblspn BBQ sauce
1 tblspn tabasco
1 tblspn yellow mustard
1 tspn wocestershire
1 tspn chili powder
S & P to taste

I sweat veg, brown meat, add beer, add sauce and spice, simmer all day until meat paste forms. Serve on fresh brioche buns. With dill pickle and chips
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@Mike9 that looks like the perfect recipe. Lee Drumond uses a little chili powder too while Tyler Florence adds a touch of vinegar.

@Planethoff I like the idea of adding a little celery too! I'll save the pickles for the side because I'm a huge lover of green pepper.
 

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@Mike9
that looks like the perfect recipe. Lee Drumond uses a little chili powder too while Tyler Florence adds a touch of vinegar.

@Planethoff
I like the idea of adding a little celery too! I'll save the pickles for the side because I'm a huge lover of green pepper.
I love green pepper too and it is a staple and great in sloppy Joe's . I just switched to the b&b pickle for sweet crunch, but you can also cook with green pepper and top with b&b pickle chips on finished product. Both ways are great

I do have to question Mike9's video. I don't agree with cold pan start. But to each their own I guess
 

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I make Joe's every couple of months, here's my take. No measurements, I just eyeball it to taste and adjust.

Brown off ground beef, season (in place of salt) with beef base, add diced onion & red and green bell peppers. I'll add celery too if I have it.

Equal parts ketchup and tomato sauce, one can of stewed tomatoes.

Season with black pepper, granulated garlic, granulated onion, Tbsp smoked paprika.

To taste, brown sugar and balsamic vinegar. I also add a good squirt of yellow mustard.

Bring up to temp and simmer and reduce for a couple hrs. Adjust seasoning again before serving.

I forgo a bun and make pan fried sourdough croutons, and serve with tots and slaw.
 

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koukouvagia If your childhood memory is bright red sloppy joe (as is mine) it might not be one of the long simmered recipes. I grew up with Manwich made in the minimum amount of time. It's fairly red. But if simmered longer as I now do it isn't as vibrant in color.

Sometimes I forgo the bun and put the Joe on a pile of fries. There are so many interesting ways to eat sloppy joe!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well here goes nothing.  I'm using the recipe Mike9 posted but I added a finely minced stalk of celery, and some chili powder.  It's simmering away.
 

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@Planethoff
- I've done it both ways and find the cold pan start produces a meat with more crumble that's a little more tender IMO.
I totally get that and see the benefit. I am still able to achieve that texture by cooking it literally all day. I make it somewhat like I make my chili. I like the flavor from the super hot sear, but if were doing it in a shorter time period I would do a cold pan start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·

What a treat. It was a little too sweet eventhough I lessened the sugar from 2tbs to 2 tsp. And I added a little vinegar but I think it needed more. I should've used leaner meat, I ended up having to strain it at the end and strained it too much. Now I know!
 

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I should've used leaner meat, I ended up having to strain it at the end and strained it too much. Now I know!
I was going to say.. sirloin 90% lean 10% fat usually gives me that great crumble. With a 10% fat if you start it and render what little fat out you can then sweat some onions/peppers in that. If you are OK with beef tallow as opposed to say olive oil, there's no reason to strain such lean beef in my opinion. In higher concentrations I find tallow to be greasy.. as opposed to oily.. I know many of you will know what I mean.
 

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Simple version from my childhood

2 pounds ground beef

1 medium chopped onion

1 can condensed tomato soup(Campbell's!)

sugar to taste

Black pepper to taste, I use a LOT

Brown the beef with the onion and pepper(salt is optional but the soup adds a LOT of it)

When the onion is tender add the tomato soup and stir it in, let it simmer 20 minutes, add sugar to taste, simmer a bit more.

Serve on a cheap fluffy white bun with hamburger dill slices.
 

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Simple version from my childhood

2 pounds ground beef
1 medium chopped onion
1 can condensed tomato soup(Campbell's!)
sugar to taste
Black pepper to taste, I use a LOT

Brown the beef with the onion and pepper(salt is optional but the soup adds a LOT of it)
When the onion is tender add the tomato soup and stir it in, let it simmer 20 minutes, add sugar to taste, simmer a bit more

Serve on a cheap fluffy white bun with hamburger dill slices.
I always admire your great tasting, tried and true, no nonsense recipes
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I was going to say.. sirloin 90% lean 10% fat usually gives me that great crumble. With a 10% fat if you start it and render what little fat out you can then sweat some onions/peppers in that. If you are OK with beef tallow as opposed to say olive oil, there's no reason to strain such lean beef in my opinion. In higher concentrations I find tallow to be greasy.. as opposed to oily.. I know many of you will know what I mean.
I know what you mean. I used ground chuck which I think is 20% fat. It's my default ground meat so I got it without thinking. I think a leaner meat would've made a difference.
 
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