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This is one of my least favorite kitchen tasks -- always just do it by hand. Any tricks or tools out there for doing this when a large amount needs to be done?
 

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If it's the chopped kind, though, it might just fly right through the holes in the spinner. I've used some brands of chopped spinach that were just this side of pureed!

I use one of those fine-mesh pointy-bottomed strainers, and press with a wooden spoon. Or if one had a strainer and bowl of compatible sizes, one could put the spinach in the strainer and press with the bowl, maybe?
 

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Hate that one too! I do it a lot myself and I find that your hands really are the best instrument for that one because any other method simply leaves too much water in.
...Although I've always been tempted to line a potato ricer (the giant garlic-press)with cheescloth and give it a go with that...Hmmm..
 

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The best way in my opinion is to thaw in a perferated hotel pan in the sink. After thawing, using another hotel pan, sqeeze together.
 

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Sodaro,

To add to Chef David Simpson's method, after putting the spinich in a perf. pan place that pan in a deeper hotel pan. Place another pan on top of the spin. and then put two or three #10 cans in this pan. You now walk away and do some thing else and when you are done your other task the spinich is just about dry.

D.Lee
 

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I always start out that way too, CompassRose. It seems to help a lot to contain the mess to the strainers instead of stopping up the sink :) Then I finish it up by hand. I guess our hands are our most important tools. :)
 

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I just use a potato ricer. Insert the plate with the smallest holes and squeeze away. The spinach doesn't go through the holes, even if it's been chopped. I have a Japanese friend and she puts the spinach in a tea towel, folds it over, then twists the ends in opposite directions. It works well, but I hate to do anything which makes more laundry!
 

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That's very interesting, Garlicginger, but isn't it hard to get the clingy spinach out of the tee towel? Do you mean one of those disposable cloth like towels, or a terry cloth type?
 

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I use a large fine mesh strainer (I don't have a chinois) and press globs of spinach against the sides of it with a fork. That does a really good job for me. Of course, I do only a 10 oz package or a 1 lb. bag at a time! Wring large amounts in cheesecloth? Put the spinach in cheesecloth, lay it between two towels and use a rolling pin? You got me....
 

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I use a large fine mesh strainer (I don't have a chinois) and press globs of spinach against the sides of it with a fork. That does a really good job for me. Of course, I do only a 10 oz package or a 1 lb. bag at a time! Wring large amounts in cheesecloth? Put the spinach in cheesecloth, lay it between two towels and use a rolling pin? You got me....
 

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I hate to do that too, for fresh or frozen spinach.  But with home cooking quantities, it can be done more easily, and the easiest is by hand.  My problem is that i usually do fresh and it takes forever for it to cool enough to want to squeeze it, so i'm interested in some other methods that aren;t as time consuming as pressing it with a fork through a strainer!

In a large quantity, i would think you'd need something that has holes like a strainer but that is very wide and flat.  Maybe that's what a perforated hotel pan is?  but a chinois would not be a good choice, for large quantities anyway, because the spinach is too thick and what is in the middle would keep the liquid. 

How big are your ricers, Pete and Phatch?  I imagine very big, but can they be THAT big?

Some sort of centrifuge would be perfect - surprised they never invented one - but maybe your restaurant salad spinners are stronger than the home variety?  Mine won't turn even if i mistakenly put a tomato in it. 
 

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Washing  machine spinning is done in volume quite often. Cold water feed line only , tossed then spin dried.

 Home I use ricer but then let it sit overnight in fridge and squeeze again. Bone Dry
 

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I defrost thoroughly, let it drain in a strainer, then squeeze by hand and think of it as cooking -- a thing to be enjoyed.

Maybe I don't use large enough quantities frequently enough too see it as unpleasant. If frozen spinach has a reason for being, it's how much easier it is to squeeze out than fresh.

An old trick is to put the drained, defrosted spinach in a towel, make a "bindle," and twist the neck until the pressure forces the moisture through the towel. The downsides are leaving a good bit of spinach on the cloth (especially if you're using chopped) and permanently staining the towel. Not that big a problem if you started with a bright green rag, I suppose.

If chopped spinach in bulk is too much onerous, use whole leaf, dry it in your spinner, then chop in a food processor.

BDL
 
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