Chef Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since I wasn't sure how to search for this topic I'm just starting the thread and I'm sure it will be a short one.

I'm getting a handle on sharpening my gyoto (thanks to all that responded earlier)  I'm not crazy sharp, slicing hair but it does a great job on food.  I've scratched the blade up some by having too shallow an angle at times but overall, I'm making great progress.

So, I'm finding now, when cutting slightly wet stuff like cucumbers or the like that the cut stuff sticks to the knife.  OK, not a big deal, next cut over the top and it falls off but I'm not a machine gun chopper or as accomplished as someone that works in a kitchen.  I think I get the conversations I've read about "bite" and perhaps this has something to do with it.

So, what suggestions are their in modifying either my sharpening or cutting technique?  Or do I just ignore it because that's the way it is.  As always, thanks in advance.

Michael
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
11,776 Posts
It's what it is. You have a smooth polish surface with wet stuff. It's going to stick. You need to introduce air under it to help it slide off. This is theory behind Kullenschiffen or Granton hollows. You'll find those who think they help and those who think they don't. i'm in the don't help camp. 

The clinging is useful though. 

In proper knife technique, a right hander should be looking mostly at the right side of the knife as it cuts off the food. Reverse for a lefty of course. So with the slice of cucumber or whatever stuck on the knife, it gives you the visual cue to help you make the next cut the same size. This cut usually pushes the first slice off and then sticks in its place. 

As you practice your technique, you'll develop the muscle memory to where you don't need the visual feeback on placing your guide hand and knife for the next slice. 
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
Ahhh the eternal struggle.  If you have a fatter knife at the spine and thin at the edge, convexed on the way up, it should have better food release.  Go too fat and it could wedge.  It's all a question of what annoys you more.  We try to find the perfect knife that does not wedge AND has good food release, but it's an expensive hobby.

If food sticks to my cleaver, I don't care :D.  I have 5"+ to build up cut food between wipes.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys.  I like the upside of consistent cut width although that is an unintended consequence. At least I know it wasn't anything in particular I've done to the blade through the sharpening process.I can say that my Shun santuko that has those hollows also sticks on some thing so I'm leaning toward the "don't" camp as well.

MG
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
11,776 Posts
It's about sight lines. If you mostly see the left of the blade, then what you're cutting is obscured by your fingers in the claw grip and your blade itself. you have to raise your knife higher than your knuckles to see the size of what you're cutting which is dangerous to your claw hand. Think about it with a brunoise for example.

However, I think experienced knife users do end up looking at the left side more. They've learned a knife braille of sorts and know the size of their cuts by touch as their claw hand retreats. This body position gives more space for the knife to move to the left before needing repositiioning of everything. So there's more efficiency. But you can't start there. It's where you end up after experience and learning to work the claw grip blind as it were.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Other than having to look up "brunoise", I get it. This is my very first real chef's knife and I can't believe how much different cutting there is with it and how technique really does make a difference.  I really appreciate these tidbits that come out from the discussion.

MG
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top