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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in a fix on how to achieve a clear sugar disk (like the one used in the pic attached). Could someone please help out?
I want to use normal sugar for this. Do I use water to make syrup and then reduce that or just make a dry caramel..?
 

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Poured sugar is it...
Yes, cook sugar to hard crack. You can use a tad of Kayro syrup to keep it from crystalizing....and go for hard Crack on your candy thermometer.

Be careful about it though...because you can cause burns, caramel or some other undesired effect. Bubbles will be minimal the hotter you pour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the suggestion. I am also in doubt on how to get a circle made out of it and how to make the disk thin so that it is breakable with a spoon. P.s. I don't have a candy thermometer, use the water drop test will that suffice or do absolutely need to invest in a thermometer.
 

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Thank you for the suggestion. I am also in doubt on how to get a circle made out of it and how to make the disk thin so that it is breakable with a spoon. P.s. I don't have a candy thermometer, use the water drop test will that suffice or do absolutely need to invest in a thermometer.
It's possible to do this with the ICE water drop test....but I'd reserve recommending that for those well practiced in making hard candy this way.
It goes fast and confident hands when doing this stuff are going to provide the results you are looking for. The window of "opportunity" for candy vs Carmel can seem to be small for sugar work. And it cools quickly too.

And as far as round? A simple metal cookie cutter/biscuit cutter ring is all you need. Use parchment on a granite countertop or lightly oil a granite/marble countertop. You can use a sheetpan or stainless steel pot bottom too...just be careful.

Sugar work is fast paced stuff. Burns are the norm and it is not uncommon for those doing it to get a blister or two. Hot sugar sticks to everything and everyone.

Sugar is cheap...so practice is affordable. It's just usually frustrating because of breaking. So do extras.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's possible to do this with the ICE water drop test....but I'd reserve recommending that for those well practiced in making hard candy this way.
It goes fast and confident hands when doing this stuff are going to provide the results you are looking for. The window of "opportunity" for candy vs Carmel can seem to be small for sugar work. And it cools quickly too.

And as far as round? A simple metal cookie cutter/biscuit cutter ring is all you need. Use parchment on a granite countertop or lightly oil a granite/marble countertop. You can use a sheetpan or stainless steel pot bottom too...just be careful.

Sugar work is fast paced stuff. Burns are the norm and it is not uncommon for those doing it to get a blister or two. Hot sugar sticks to everything and everyone.

Sugar is cheap...so practice is affordable. It's just usually frustrating because of breaking. So do extras.
Thanks a lot for writing such detailed solutions I will surely give it a try as soon as I can.
 

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I am in a fix on how to achieve a clear sugar disk (like the one used in the pic attached). Could someone please help out?
I want to use normal sugar for this. Do I use water to make syrup and then reduce that or just make a dry caramel..?
1lb sugar
6 oz water
1 1/2 oz glucose or corn syrup.

bring to a boil, skim the scum off the top, don't stir it, cover and boil to wash the sides down, any sugar crystals remaining can be dissolved by brushing cold water on the sides of the pan, once all the sugar is gone from the sides let it boil uncovered to 293F/145C..
Dip the bottom of the pan briefly in cold water to arrest the process or it will quickly turn into dark caramel.

Rub your hands liberally with crisco to prevent the sugar from sticking to your skin, oil down any surface and tool that contacts the sugar.

For circles just pour or spoon out small amounts, it will naturally flow out into circles.
 
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