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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, I hope this is the correct place for this question. I’ve always wanted an induction cooktop so when I found one for sale on a local auction site, I had to buy it. I was very excited to get it home and try it out when I found something strange. As I went to plug it in, I found it has a strange plug.
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I have attached a photo of the cord. Can anyone help me figure this out? Do I need to buy some type of adapter?
Thanks in advance!
Sincerely, AlphaSkillet
 

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If you have a relatively modern American kitchen you should already have 20 amp service. I think building code requires one or two, one dedicated to the refrigerator at least. An electrician can verify and change to the appropriate plug.
 

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If you have a relatively modern American kitchen you should already have 20 amp service. I think building code requires one or two, one dedicated to the refrigerator at least.
Modern home kitchens (and dining rooms) have to have two 20A small appliance circuits however there is no requirement to have 20A receptacles (only 15A) because there are no consumer appliances that use those 20A plugs. (Except for you. :)) Electricians seem to think they need to install them anyway so you may luck out, if not have an electrician take a look and hopefully the circuit will allow just changing the receptacle. But keep in mind, that cooktop will use the entire capacity of the 20A circuit so that other devices plugged into other receptacles on that circuit will likely trip the breaker if you turn them on. Best to have a new circuit and receptacle installed just for that cooktop.

Edit: I just looked up the spec sheet for that unit. It IS NOT 120 volt but 208-240 volt. So forget about changing a receptacle. Instead, you are going to need your electrician to install a new circuit and receptacle for that plug but it's going to be 20A/240V. No big deal same price.
Here is the spec sheet for your cooktop:

Ultra Series Countertop Induction Ranges Specification Sheet (chefsdata.com)

-Hal
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The different plug is to prevent plugging a 20 amp device into a 15 amp circuit, which could cause a fire from overheating the wires. The minimum size wire specified for a 20 amp circuit are thicker than on a 15 amp circuit.
You are awesome!! My home was built in the 50’s so I had no idea. Thank you again for your help
Modern home kitchens (and dining rooms) have to have two 20A small appliance circuits however there is no requirement to have 20A receptacles (only 15A) because there are no consumer appliances that use those 20A plugs. (Except for you. :)) Electricians seem to think they need to install them anyway so you may luck out, if not have an electrician take a look and hopefully the circuit will allow just changing the receptacle. But keep in mind, that cooktop will use the entire capacity of the 20A circuit so that other devices plugged into other receptacles on that circuit will likely trip the breaker if you turn them on. Best to have a new circuit and receptacle installed just for that cooktop.

Edit: I just looked up the spec sheet for that unit. It IS NOT 120 volt but 208-240 volt. So forget about changing a receptacle. Instead, you are going to need your electrician to install a new circuit and receptacle for that plug but it's going to be 20A/240V. No big deal same price.
Here is the spec sheet for your cooktop:

Ultra Series Countertop Induction Ranges Specification Sheet (chefsdata.com)

-Hal
Thank you for taking the time to help me out! You’re awesome.
 
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