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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm new here and not a professional.

Yesterday, I made brownies using Alton Brown's Cocoa Brownie recipe, which I always go by. I used Hershey's Special Dark cocoa powder instead of regular because it was what I had. I used it to make brownies before and they were good if not a little fudgier. I didn't adjust the recipe as far as ingredients, but I decided refrigerate the batter in the pan for several hours before baking. Then I incorporated the technique of baking them for 15 minutes, taking them out to cool for 15 minutes, then baking for 30 minutes before calling it.

The middle never baked all the way through and was still gooey after cooling for 20 minutes. We still went at them and they were delicious with raspberry ice cream (which I also made and it was perfect).

I wrapped up the rest of the uncut brownie and refrigerated it. This morning, it's practically a solid bar of chocolate in the middle (and really really yummy). 馃檪

After looking again at the container of Hershey's cocoa, it does say it's Dutch processed. Should I have adjusted the fat content for that?

Thanks! (Please no snarky or rude comments)
 

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I'm agreeing with @brianshaw .
Cold batters and doughs act differently once refrigerated and stored for a while.

Dutch processed cocoa is just extra dark....processed with alkali...but neutral enough.
I'm not exactly a fan of Hersheys...their purchasing of cocoa leaves something to be desired for fair trade....they treat their workforce well and have been at the forefront for equal opportunity but their purchasing practices never have been great. But if it's all you had...I'd look at the leavening agents. Check dates. They sneak up on you. At home I have to look myself to see if they are in date. At work it's another story. Moisture can affect their performance and high humidity can make them go bad over an extended time period .
Cold batters and cookie doughs with high fat content don't act the same. Especially in something dense like a brownie.
 

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Dutch processing, washes the cocoa powder with alkali, as was stated by the others. This removes natural oils, and neutralizes the acidity of the cocoa powder. The effect is that Dutch processed cocoa powder mixes more readily with liquids. There may be a small effect on the leavening of your brownies, but not enough to notice, I agree that your cooking techniques determines the texture of the brownie far more which version of cocoa powder you use.
 

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It sounds like, at least to some degree, a happy accident? Sounds like they were still good with a unique texture. Did you like the final product well enough to make it again and have the same results? As others have stated, I doubt the cocoa powder you used had nearly as big of an impact on the final product as the cooking technique used. I once made the absolute best loaf of banana bread I have ever tasted when I was working a summer job for the National Park Service and my trailer was at a little over 6,000 feet above sea level. The bread came out with the best texture I have ever had and I've never been able to duplicate it since. Like Bob Ross says, there are no mistakes, only happy accidents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It sounds like, at least to some degree, a happy accident? Sounds like they were still good with a unique texture. Did you like the final product well enough to make it again and have the same results? As others have stated, I doubt the cocoa powder you used had nearly as big of an impact on the final product as the cooking technique used. I once made the absolute best loaf of banana bread I have ever tasted when I was working a summer job for the National Park Service and my trailer was at a little over 6,000 feet above sea level. The bread came out with the best texture I have ever had and I've never been able to duplicate it since. Like Bob Ross says, there are no mistakes, only happy accidents.
I like brownies with a delicate, cakey texture and used room temperature butter instead of the melted butter in the recipe. My husband and our friends loved them, but I thought they were seriously underdone in the center and more like a molten lava cake than a fudgey brownie. I never tried the technique of baking, cooling and baking again or refrigerating the batter like that and I wondered what difference it would make if the butter was melted or not when I mixed the batter. At least the flavor was all there but I don't consider this experience a happy accident. 馃槀
 

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You might be worrying too many things at one time. The basic problem is bake time and conditions. Your brownies were underbaked. Master that first鈥 then worry about butter melted v not melted and dutched v regular cacao, or fat content. If you are going to refrigerate before baking keep close track of batter temp as that will affect bake time.
 

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Dutch processed cocoa, Dutch cocoa, or alkalized cocoa, is cocoa solids that have been treated with an alkalizing agent to reduce the natural acidity of cocoa, giving it a less bitter taste (and darker colour) compared to "natural cocoa" extracted with the Broma process.
 
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