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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Billy's question started me thinking.

There are folks out there that call all soups chowders.

A Coke gets called so many things: In the South (esp. Mississippi) when you order a carbonated beverage, they ask you what flavour Coke would you like. In Pennsylvania, it's what kind of pop. Then, depending on where you are, its soda, soda pop,etc...

Barbecue: A world of meanings: from Texas dry rubbed, smoked beef to the Carolina's pulled pork to the NE and Midwest chicken on the grill with red sauce...

What other foods have you run in to that has many meanings...
 

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Peas~ in the west they are petit pois (green) in the south they are black eyed or field peas or crowder peas

*I found this out as an 8year old who moved from Sacramento to Little Rock.....we're not in Kansas anymore toto

Gravy.....I have a classically trained chef friend who serves a great gravy with his pork but gets really upset when it's called that....<I rarely substitute the term gravy for sauce>

I call it soda if it's carbonated....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And don't forget Italian "gravy"

a wonderful red sauce!

You can tell who I've been talking to re carbonated beverages. Just got off the phone with my PA relatives -- it's pop!
 

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momoreg- add 'bombers' to the list. In parts of Wisconsin, the term refers to hot Italian sandwiches: beef w/ gardiniera, sausage w/ sauce, meatballs w/ sauce. How about cabinet for a milk shake in New England? Or tonic for soda/pop? Of course, there's chips for french fries in England; crisps for potato chips there, too; bangers for sausages....
 

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Here in Mpls/St Paul, they call the hot Italian sandwich a "****" (not very PC). I've also heard the term "dagwood" used for the conventional sub sandwich.
 

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over in Au, each state calls its beer glass something different, so that can pretty confusing.

i.e:

200ml glass - VIC & WA "a glass"
NSW & NT "Seven"
SA "a Butcher"

285ml glass - NSW & WA "a Middy"
Vic, Qld & TAS "a Pot"
SA "a Schooner"

425ml glass - NSW "a Schooner"

1 pint glass - "a Pint"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
From my east coast experience, stuffing is more of a northern thing, while dressing is more southern.

"Stuffing" seems to tend to be more of a bread based carb; while dressing is denser, wetter and often a cornbread based item.

Then you have the Louisiana oyster dressing...very yummy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Katherine,

Really I agree with you but I can tell you there are many out there that cook stuffing in a bowl and dressing in the bird -- depending on where you live!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Jimmies in Tupelo Mississippi (birthplace of Elvis Presley) and Sprinkles in Maryland and DC! I like the name of Thousands and Millions the best though!
 
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