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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought Sichuan pepper oil, probably by mistake (can't remember what I bought it for). I tried to use some in fried rice but it wasn't a huge success with my family. I wonder what it's typically used for?

Thanks!
Bottle Green Ingredient Drink Glass bottle
 

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I figure it's a flavouring oil, just like chili oil.
I've never seen and used it before.
Maybe as a dressing on vegetables or salad? Sort of like a vinaigrette?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thing is it's pretty potent and strong. I used a teaspoon in a pot of fried rice to feed 6 people and my 10 year old kid couldn't even eat it. Maybe it's an acquired taste. My 14 year old didn't like it so he added tablespoons of tuong-ot to cover the taste. :ROFLMAO:

First time I ruin a whole batch of fried rice with only a teaspoon of an ingredient. 🙄
 

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That's not a commonly used oil in my experience. Usually the various allium oils are more common. And chie oil.

For your pepper oil, a little on a hot pot would be good. Use a bit to start off mapo tofu and kung pao but use more neutral oil too.
 

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There's a YouTube channel called Taste Show. I posted a few videos here before from it particularly that one where the Thai Chef is chopping shallots with the heel of her knife. The more common host is Chef John. He uses his flavored oils quite a bit, mostly an allium and other vegetables oil he calls aroma oil. But he does make and use Sichuan peppercorn oil too.

Here is his oil video


But if you go through some of his older work you'll also find him using his peppercorn oil.

In Chinese cuisine scallion oil seems to be the most common. IMHO it often gets skipped over in western recipes because it's used as a garnish and not as obvious as some of the other flavors in the dish. Chile oil has a bigger impact on the dish so you don't usually see it get skipped over so much. Eileen Yin-Fei-Lo highlights scallion oil in her Mastering the Art of Chinese Cooking. On my initial reading I thought that was kind of odd but with my better experience now I see it more commonly.

In the Singapore Malay region I see more shallot oil than scallion oil. It's used with a heavier hand earlier in the cooking.
 

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Like extra-virgin olive oil, Sichuan pepper oil is a finishing oil, not a stir-fry cooking oil. It is used in Sichuan cold dishes and salads, added at the finish to "water-boiled" hot dishes and sauces, and preferred anytime one wants a smooth hit of intense flavor without the powder and husk (or when you just want to save time grinding!).

Unlike olive oil, Sichuan pepper oil is not meant to be tasted or used on its own. It is too potent, and a little bitter, on its own, and only shines when combined with other flavors, such as chilies (mala) or savory and fatty flavors. A little goes a long way.
This is new knowledge to me and seems like an interesting shortcut when making Sichuan dishes. If Chef John uses it... it must be good within the correct context!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Like extra-virgin olive oil, Sichuan pepper oil is a finishing oil, not a stir-fry cooking oil. It is used in Sichuan cold dishes and salads, added at the finish to "water-boiled" hot dishes and sauces, and preferred anytime one wants a smooth hit of intense flavor without the powder and husk (or when you just want to save time grinding!).

Unlike olive oil, Sichuan pepper oil is not meant to be tasted or used on its own. It is too potent, and a little bitter, on its own, and only shines when combined with other flavors, such as chilies (mala) or savory and fatty flavors. A little goes a long way.
That description is very accurate indeed! Thanks for providing that link. :)
 

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I think brushing on whole cuts could be too intense. If you diluted it with other oils, say garlic or chili, then you'd get a better balance. A dribble in a marinade should work. I don't know how volatile it is to withstand say a hot cast iron pan though. Maybe you'd drive off just the intensity or the flavor.
 

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My curiosity is running crazy, I guess I am going to have to buy some and play. Although I figure it is like previously said, a finishing oil, I am still going to have to get some hands on experience and get out the box sideways, upside down, and any other disorienting way I can come up with. Oh boy, how much fun!!!
 
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