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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to buy a stand mixer.

Should I get a planetary mixer or a mixer with rotary beaters? 

I am a home cook and I would use it for cookies, cakes, and whipping cream. I will not be using it to make bread or pizza dough. I want one with a tilt head that locks in the tilt position. I will be storing it away when not in use. A glass bowl and splatter shield would be nice. I want a mixer that does not leave unmixed ingredients anywhere in the bowl.

Thank you for any input. 
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The reason that a glass bowl would be nice is so that I can soften the butter (I keep it frozen in the fridge) in the bowl in the microwave before making a recipe. Can't put metal in the microwave of course. It is not a requirement, though. 
 

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You can put metal bowls in the nuker, you just have to make sure that the bowl doesn't the sides of the nuker. Been doing this for years.

Metal bowls dent when dropped, glass shatters.
 

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I've used both types - a Sunbeam Mixmaster (rotary) and Kitchenaid Artisan (planetary).

My favorite for batters was the Mixmaster. It was easier to add ingredients while mixing and was more complete at mixing than the Kitchenaid.

For bread, though, I prefer the single bread hook of the Kitchenaid more than the two bread hooks of the Mixmaster. In terms of speed and power they are about equal. The Mixmaster does a good job at kneading but needs to be monitored more because the rotating bowl can wobble and sometimes the rotation stalls... both situations easily correctable by caressing the bowl but one needs to be standing there watching during the entire process.

The Mixmaster didn't have a splatter shield, but I don't find them useful anyway.

I've only used metal bowls and prefer them to glass. I once saw a glass bowl from a vintage Mixmaster hit the floor. It was a mess of glass shards. My metal bowls have hit the floor with nary a dent.

For butter, I've put refrigerator cold butter sticks in both and started mixing at slow speed. They "chunk around" a bit but soften up in about 1 minute. The consistency is better than you'll ever get by microwaving to soften butter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you, that was helpful. Those are actually the top two mixers I am currently debating between.

Which one would you recommend for cookie dough (especially thick cookie dough with lots of nuts and chips in it)? That is what I make the most of. 
 

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Thank you, that was helpful. Those are actually the top two mixers I am currently debating between.

Which one would you recommend for cookie dough (especially thick cookie dough with lots of nuts and chips in it)? That is what I make the most of.
For thick dough with lots of nuts and chips - like chocolate chip cookies or fruitcake - I prefer the Kitchenaid. Reason: flat beater is easier to scrape the dough off and clean than the cylindrical beaters..

When I was using the Mixmaster I would mix the batter with the beaters but change to the dough hooks for mixing in the nuts and chips.

Either will get the job done, though... one just needs to know the peculiarities of the machine and work with it.
 
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