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oh dear . . .

get a round pencil, or a round dowel, slightly less than the diameter / distance between the serration points.

wrap some 1000 grit wet/dry sandpaper around the pencil/dowel, carefully 're-point' the serrations.
yes, this is not an 'instant' method - it could easily take 6-8 minutes on a 10" blade ....
finish by a flat touch up on the back side.

30 year SuperSlicer - still going strong and sharp as ever.
 

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I give them to the pro knife sharpeners and for a fee they can do a nice job. Not all of the pro's are good though....some grind away your knife...NOT Good! Some of my knives I've had for thirty years or more...still look cherry after decades of service and razor sharp...like close shaves on my chin. But my straight edged knives I hand sharpen using an Arkansas Stone progression to a black Arkansas. Then a steel after getting my edge.

For me, an Arkansas stone progression, through the three, polishes that edge to a mirror and produces an edge that lasts months. And I butcher meat, cut through 50# bags of carrots and onions....whatever....just a touch up with the steel and they are good to go.
 

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Sharpening Bread slicers were a mystery to me until about 10 years ago when I tripped headfirst down the rabbit hole of hand tool woodworking.

As a chef, I took to sharpening chisels and plane irons ( blades) like a duck to water, but sharpening handsaws were a huge “aha!” moment for me, as the bread knife is really just a food grade handsaw!
While all of the above suggestions are good and will work quite well, probably the best tool is a ( wait for it..) chainsaw file. They’re cheap and easy to get, find one that nestles into the gullets ( valleys between the humps), sandwich the blade between two pieces of wood and clamp in a vice so the teeth are exposed but the blade doesn’t vibrate and shriek like a witch when you file. You’ll have to find the bevel on the inside of the teeth and copy this with the angle of your file. You will naturally raise a burr on the opposite side of the teeth and can remove this with any number of tools, but the cheapest is a piece of wood with honing compound rubbed on it, although chrome polish, Automotive paint compound or any other type of polish will work just as well— they are all fine abrasives.

Knife sharpeners ( the people, not the machine) generally won’t do this, as it can take up to 15 minutes to file each tooth ona8” or9” knife. Most of them will treat the bread knife just like single bevel knife, and sharpen the bevel and polish the flat side, but this abrades down the teeth, and if you don’t file the gullets deeper the teeth shrink until you just have a mildly wavy—albeit sharp, tooth line. It is the action of each tooth “ biting” into a bread crust that cuts, unlike a long consistent edge of a Chef’s knife that cuts vegetables or meat.

Hope this helps....
 

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The right tool for manually sharpening your serrated knife is a ceramic honing rod. It's also called a sharpening rod, and this can be confusing. A ceramic honing rod is harder than a steel honing rod, so the ceramic will remove some of the material from the blade's edge, which has a sharpening effect.
 

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....... But my straight edged knives I hand sharpen using an Arkansas Stone progression to a black Arkansas. Then a steel after getting my edge......
A representative from one major supplier of stones stated to me that a black arkansas stone is an aka for a surgical stone that has been dyed black for easy identification.
 

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A representative from one major supplier of stones stated to me that a black arkansas stone is an aka for a surgical stone that has been dyed black for easy identification.
Uhhhhh.....depends on where you go to get one. I got mine from a stone cutter and I had to resurface it smooth and level using carbide grit and a piece of glass.
Wore my arms out doing it.
 

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Uhhhhh.....depends on where you go to get one. I got mine from a stone cutter.....
Are you stating that your is naturally black? Was the "mother" stone colored black? My supplier stated that really superfine and dense arkansas, no matter the color, are called surgical stones and are dyed black.

(EDIT) Ahhh the following link will clarify for the both of us and I stand corrected:

 
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Are you stating that your is naturally black? Was the "mother" stone colored black? My supplier stated that really superfine and dense arkansas, no matter the color, are called surgical stones and are dyed black.

(EDIT) Ahhh the following link will clarify for the both of us and I stand corrected:

Yeah....Dan's stones get pricey but come completely lapped (smooth and level) .
I'm a "do it yourself" kind of guy so I got mine from a stone cutter.

I got three grades. The soft Arkansas (why they call it soft I don't know....it polishes most edges just fine for most people)

Then comes the white/Grey which is for honing and polishing the edge.

Then finally when your arms and fingers are worn out you get to the black.
I use the same stones for my straight razors....but for the razors I use a leather strop as well as a different angle for the edge.

These type of edges aren't for everyone. But I care for my knives well. They have lasted me a lifetime of use.
 

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The right tool for manually sharpening your serrated knife is a ceramic honing rod. It's also called a sharpening rod, and this can be confusing. A ceramic honing rod is harder than a steel honing rod, so the ceramic will remove some of the material from the blade's edge, which has a sharpening effect.
A sharp edge is where two surfaces meet, if the junction they meet at is rounded, the edge is dull.
Sharpening is using a medium to remove steel on both surfaces so the junction is crisp again. The coarser the medium used to remove steel, the more ragged the edge is which will degenerate quickly.
Honing is using a fine medium to refine the ragged surfaces, honing removes only microscopically amounts of steel, but the refined edge is much more stable.

As I wrote in my first post, the cutting action of a serrated knife relies on the teeth of the blade to score or a chisel a path across a hard surface like bread crust, as a smooth albeit sharp chef’s knife will only skate across a bread crust.

A honing rod is best used for honing, as it will not remove the material needed to reestablish a crisp junction where the two surfaces of the knife meet.

With knives made of softer steel the honing rod is used to straighten out the tissue-thin, easily bendable edge that tends to curl over. This can be done several times until that edge fatigues and breaks off.

The medium used to remove metal is a personal choice, as each type of abrasive medium has its pros and cons
 

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Yeah....Dan's stones get pricey but come completely lapped (smooth and level) .
I'm a "do it yourself" kind of guy so I got mine from a stone cutter. .......
Well who the blazes is your stone cutter????? Do NOT keep it a secret. Inquiring minds want to know...
 

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I'm really uncertain on that one as it was stated some years ago. It may have been someone and I might be wrong at Hall's Pro Edge.

Who in blazes told you that black arks are dyed? Do NOT keep it a secret. Inquiring minds want to know..
 

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