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What type of ingredient absorbs smoke the best?

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I hot smoke but the concepts are the same.

So here are my tips:

-Wet fuel is pointless.  It won't smoke until the water is gone, you're just delaying the burning/smouldering that makes smoke

-There's clean smoke from burning at a high enough temp and dirty smoke from not burning at a high enough temp.  Billowing white smoke will make your food taste like a chimney and possibly get you sick from creosotes,  thin blue smoke is what we aim for in barbecue.   Someone with smoke gun experience will know better about the particulars of how you want to burn.

-If you're smoking fish (or meat), a very important concept is the pellicle formation.  Before you start, you should  air dry long enough that the surface is kind of sticky.   If it's wet the smoke won't adhere as well.

-How about some spices?  The key on this is surface area,  spread them out.  Actually that goes for fish too if you slice it thin you get more surface area for smoke adhesion. 

I think you'll get the best results cold smoking the traditional stuff that is cold smoked:  cheese, fish, spices.  You won't get a ton of flavor into meat unless you slice it very thin.  For vegetables, you'll get a lot more flavor out of charring it hard. 
 

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I smoke and fry wings all the time.  I've won chicken wing contests in fact you can say they are award winning.  Usually with chicken I smoke at 325+ to render fat from the skin and get crispy skin.  If i'm going to fry,  i go low and slow 225-250.   The skin is leathery but the deep fryer will crisp it up before saucing/glazing.  This gets you that soft tender juicy meat you get from low and slow cooking, and a hint of smoke.  The other thing this does is lets you smoke the wings ahead of time and parcook. 

This whole method is so forgiving.  If you pull the wings at 150 or 180 IT,  it's still good.    dry rub -> smoker -> fryer -> glaze
 

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Yep wings has a great surface area of skin/fat and also a great amount of fat overall.  For this style wing I wouldn't coat in anything before frying.  The other thing the smoking does is it will dry out the skin.  When you fry it will crisp up on its own very fast.   Same principle as when you see dehydrated chicharrons before frying.  The second it hits oil they expand and crisp.  Corn starch or flour will make it hold more oil unnecessarily and also that type of crust gets soggy in the sauce faster

There's no wrong way to do wings though :)
 
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