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What type of ingredient absorbs smoke the best?

  • Fats & Lipids

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  • Meats & Fishes

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd love to explore hot smoking, but don't want to devote all that time to it. Use deep hotel with wood chips/dust/other sizes and a perforated pan on top and lid. I have 2 hours to smoke...I have a commercial kitchen at my disposal and with that comes a refrigerator/freezer/dry goods rack as test subjects. 

Which ingredients will carry the smoke the most and the least and find out what the optimal level of smoke for the palate?

Fats, proteins, liquids, grains, fruits, veggies? 

Does the size of the vessel you place the ingredients in matter?

For example, 1# melted butter unsalted in a shallow dish where more surface area is exposed versus in a tall vessel which may take longer to absorb smoke, but retains the smoke essence much longer.

What is the optimal heat application?

High heat to get smoke going with wood dust right on top of burner and place increasing size of wood chips towards the center or medium heat throughout the whole process?

Does placement of ingredient matter?

Does soaking wood chips matter?

I got tired of playing devils advocate to multiple theories as to what the answer is for the questions above. 

Whoa, that was a Cheftalk wormhole, I came on to see if my other question passed moderation and 3 hours later and many threads read, I'm posing another question I need assistance with.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I only have minimal experience with smoked foods (A place I worked at smoked chickens for 6hrs before roasting), but I think fat absorbs smoke flavor the most. The chicken had a smoky flavor mostly through out, but the skin and fat really held that flavor for the finished dish. A side note about the process is that this place did not have a traditional smoker, they had a metal cambro type of container that would hold perforated sheet pans. Two sizzle pans would be filled with hickory chips and fired up on the range, after igniting and burning for a few minutes would be extinguished with a damp side towel and placed at the base of the container. The container was sealed (Airtight I think?) and rolled outside until the shift change. Anyone else seen this technique used in lieu of a full sized smoker?
That gives me an idea for a smoked fried chicken and waffles. I wonder if i could also infuse the batter with smoke or would that be overkill?
 
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