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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I've been reading the forum for awhile now researching in anticipation of finding a Gyuto knife.

After reading lots on this forum it's obviously that every knife is individual to the user and intended use, therefore I thought it would be best to ask the question, even though there are heaps of "I want to buy my first..." questions on here.

I am not a professional in the industry, definitely a hobbyist, but I appreciate the art and process to own and maintain a high quality Japanese knife. Happy to spend a bit more money on something that is also an artwork, not just a tool, around $300.

I've looked at countless knives, starting at Shun and Miyabi etc, now looking at knives that seem to be more unique:

- Takeda Aogami Super

http://www.chuboknives.com/products/takeda-aogami-super-gyutou-210mm-8-3#.Ve2SPJ2qqko

- Fijiwara san's Maboroshi

http://www.teruyasu.net/products/gyuto.html

- Kurosaki R2 western

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/kur2gy.html

- Masamoto KS

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/maksgy24.html

I used the Fujiwara knife at a store today, really nice, but not sure what I want yet.

Love some suggestions.

Cheers.
 

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You mention maintenance, but what about it, ie, what about sharpening, how are you going to accomplish this?

Idiosyncrasies aside a well made blade in R2 is going to be superior to the Masamoto.  Just as good as the Kurosaki by all accounts, though les fancy and a whole lot cheaper, is the Takamura Migaki.

Rick
 

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Have you checked out any of the "Gesshin" blades over at JKI?  I had a hard time finding what I wanted, in a knife, and after a lot of advice I am now looking at their "entry level" but also claimed as a"workhorse" knife so it might be something you're interested in.  It's called the "Uraku," and  I'm getting a 240 in Stainless, but you could look at the carbon steels as well.  They also have the Gesshin STainless which is the Uraku (I think), but in a western handle and I think all Stainless.


Good luck, with whatever you pick, it's a hard, long journey, but hopefully worth it in the end :).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your input rick,

There is a knife sharpener I can take it to to learn from, he studied under a master blacksmith in Japan in Seki for 10 years.

I appreciate the that the Takamura Migaki is cheaper, but as you say it's not as fancy, and I'm happy to pay more for something more attractive.
 

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Takeda's are known for grind issues. Out of your list the Masamoto KS is my favorite. It's light, thin and very nimble with a classic Sab KS profile and solid white #2 with excellent fit and finish. You can get one cheaper from Japan - http://global.rakuten.com/en/store/yamakawa/item/masamoto-ks3124/ Tip - if you go this route pony up for EMS mail. Will get to you in @ a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the reply Mike9,

I liked the Masamoto KS because of it's classic appeal too

Thanks for the website tip, I would try to get one from Japan I have colleagues that go there regularly, I'll have one smuggle one back to Aus. 

I really like the finish of the Takeda, shame it has issues with the grind.

Anyone elaborate on this one?
 

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Google:
site:kitchenknifeforums.com Takeda AND grind
19 frickin pages of comments http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/s...-for-(now)-to-keep-from-getting-screwed/page8

Some say they are in love with it as is, but I guess what it comes down to is that the Takeda being all carbon you can, with tolerable effort and given some ability and appropriate equipment, grind it down to whatever you want it to be, within the limits of AS.

Ahhhh....If you twist things enough sounds almost like the American way to success.

On his own page Dave Martel complained of the newer Takeda grind, but here he seems a little wishywashy on the matter.

For myself the most damning single criticism was that it (the old version anyway) took a bend-set to easy.

Over the years I have observeed that people either love the Takeda or think not over much of it.

Rick
 

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I have 2 Takeda gyutos - owned the 240 for two years before getting a smaller one for cramped quarters.  Love 'em both!  No wedging or other issues with the grind.  The AS takes a durable edge, but easily touched up with occasional proper stropping.  I also have the Gesshin Heiji carbon 240.  It's a heavy-duty workhorse but doesn't sing to me like the Takedas.

Please keep in mind that you'll need to become proficient at sharpening whatever your final decision.  Get a couple of nice stones and listen to your knife sharpener friend.
 

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I really really want a Masamoto KS.  It's probably the next one I'll buy (although maybe not for awhile).
 
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