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:bounce:

Hi there CTC friends.

You kids are going to have to forgive me, I am having a problem. My problem is I am a long devoted knife nut. I try to buy a new knife ever other week. I have found my self intrigued by one knife.
The cleaver I am using is actually to be specific a DEXTER m# 5387 Hi carbon light weight [24oz]. Cost 30 bucks and I ground a better [flatter] edge on.

I find my self running around like a nut with this thing hitting and cutting things.
My friend I hired to work [as wait staff] at a party, asked me if I was coring/slicing tomatoes with butchers cleaver. I said why yes I am, it works well doesn't it.

I saw the guys at the Meat packing plant using these cleavers with unbelievable precision and effectiveness.
Does anyone else do this, am I all alone, Is there anyone out there, there, there?
Thanks Mike:bounce: :confused:
 

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I still have the first blade I ever bought...I chinese slicing cleaver when I was 17. Light, all carbon, edges readily, stays sharp...It's the only knife I used other than a pairing knife for 2 years. I can flute a mushroom, bone a chicken, trim tenderloins....everything with it. I only use it for special occassions anymore though...sentimental value.
 

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Hear, hear!! I, too, find my cleaver indispensible in the kitchen. Not a big ol' meat cleaver, rather the 'diet', vegetable version. Wood handle and plenty of knuckle clearance space. I also find the width of the blade promotes better ergonomics, especially after 6 hours of wacking on vegetables.
 

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I don't own any, but one of the place I do cooking classes has a few of them in their "for Chef's use" collection. I use the Santuko 8" every time I'm there and everything I've seen points to an exceptional quality blade. It has a faded bolster to the heel as well for longevity under harsh sharpening conditions which is a plus. Well balanced, easily sharpened, stayed sharp and very comfy in the hand. A little pricy for the size I thought, but then I like it better than than the Whustofs/Henckel/F.Dick/ traditional style blades of the same size. If I found a 10"....I'd get it in a second.
 

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A simple (?) question...I have been using the chinese cleavers..elcheapos for about 30 years...and a paring knife. But I was at a friends house and she asked me to do some cutting etc. and..danged I felt like an idiot....I could not use the knives she had with any expertise at all... I need a size and type of knife to get me back into American/English cutting. some sort of chef's knife??? lol lol I mean geesh I can peel radishes with my cleaver but i couldn't figure out the other knives. Well the job got done of course but ......or do i start packing my cleavers??? lol
 

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Chef Richard Hahn formerly of the US Cold Competition Olympic Team just did a demo at my school. He was using his Chinese Cleaver like it was his right hand. I just thought that was quite interesting, as well, someone even asked him about his habit. He just said "its light, sharp, and comfortable -- that's all that matters." Thought I'd share. :)
 
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